Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Commemorates 75th Anniversary of Doolittle Raid on Tokyo

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor commemorates the 75th anniversary of the World War II Doolittle Raid with special presentations for youth and the general public by Jonna Doolittle Hoppes, author, educator and granddaughter of General Jimmy Doolittle, leader of the famed Doolittle (Tokyo) Raid that took place April 18, 1942.

On April 17, 2017, from 10–11 am, students and their teachers are invited to a free youth presentation by Hoppes entitled, “Calculated Risk: Jimmy Doolittle and the Tokyo Raid.” The presentation is named after Hoppes’ first book. Hoppes will discuss the Doolittle Raid and the brave men who, under her grandfather’s leadership, inspired a nation and changed the course of WWII.

This youth event is provided at no cost, and teachers who register their classes will receive a free copy of one of Hoppes’ books, Just Doing My Job or Calculated Risk, as well as corresponding curriculum to use before or after the event. Funding for bus transportation will be provided if requested on the registration form. Seating is limited, and registration is recommended by emailing Education@PacificAviationMuseum.org or calling 808-445-9137.

On April 18, at 2:30 pm, Hoppes will conduct a Hangar Talk for the general public, followed by a book signing and meet-and-greet reception. Admission for the Hangar Talk is free with museum admission, free to museum members, and free to military and military families with valid ID.

On April 18, 1942, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, eighty men from all walks of life volunteered to fly B-25 bombers (normally land-based aircraft) that took off from the deck of the USS Hornet. The dangerous and unorthodox mission, led by (then Lt. Colonel) Jimmy Doolittle, represented the first air strike by the United States on Japanese homelands. The raid provided a much-needed boost to American morale and changed the course of WWII. It bolstered American morale to such an extent that on April 28, ten days after the attack, Lt. Colonel Doolittle was promoted to Brigadier General and was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Theodore Roosevelt upon his return to the United States in June.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is located on historic Ford Island, where bombs fell during the attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. Visitors to the museum can see remnants from that day of infamy, including the 158-foot tall, red and white, iconic Ford Island control tower; Hangars 37 and 79; and bullet holes in Hangar 79. Through its preservation and restoration of World War II fighter planes and accompanying artifacts in the Museum’s historic hangars, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor shares the story of the vital role aviation played in the winning of World War II and its continuing role in maintaining America’s freedom.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Its mission is to honor aviators and their support personnel who defended freedom in the Pacific Region; to develop and maintain an internationally recognized aviation museum on historic Ford Island that educates young and old alike; and to preserve Pacific aviation history.

For more information, contact: 808-441-1000 or email Marketing@PacificAviationMuseum.org.

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